Questions and Answers

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Asked on: 05-02-10

Asked By: Paul Self

Topic of the Question: Session II: Mr. Marion Barnes

Question:
Mr Barnes, Your presentation had a slide of a fence configuration to keep deer out of food plots. Can you provide me with more details on how to set one up? Thanks, Paul Self

Answered by: Marion barnes

Answer:
Mr. Self, I have a copy of a publication AFW6 Reducing Deer Damage at Home and on the Farm. It has several feence designs in it as well as other information on reducing deer damage to crops If you will send me your complete mailing address I will mail you a copy. It also may be on line . Thank you for your intrest, Marion

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Asked on: 05-02-16

Asked By: Paul Self

Topic of the Question: Session III: Mr. Brian Murphy

Question:
Harvesting Does seems to be key to QDM pratices, I'm assuming the main reason is to lower the size of the deer herd to be more in balance with the habitat, thus maximizing a deers potential. My question pertains to wild hogs. Will they adversely effect the buck deer potential the same way as too many does? Do you have any case studies or examples you could share? I've brought this up to the leaders of our property co-op, but they seem to think it only applies to "deer purists". We are trying QDM but I'm afraid hog populations are too great for it to work very well. We do our part to harvest hogs, but are not allowed to live trap and remove. Any thoughts? Thanks, Paul Self

Answered by: Brian Murphy

Answer:
Paul, Wild hogs and QDM programs are generally not a good mix. Hogs compete directly with both bucks and does for food and cover. Hogs also destroy food plots and, at even moderate densities, can reduce the number and quality of deer that can be maintained on a given property. Given this, I suggest you discuss the subject of hogs vs. quality deer with the members of your club and make a decision - one way or the other. I would suggest waging war on the hogs, because it generally takes a war to make a difference. Hogs have multiple litters annually and live in thick, inacessible areas, making them difficult to control. Trapping programs are genearlly most successful, but heavy hunting pressure can make a difference. Good luck, Brian Murphy Executive Director / Wildlife Biologist Quality Deer Management Association
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Asked on: 05-02-21

Asked By: Will Montgomery

Topic of the Question: Session II: Mr. Marion Barnes

Question:
I was wondering if I could also get more information the correct way to build a fence that will keep deer out of my dove field. Thanks, Will Montgomery

Answered by: Marion Barnes

Answer:
Will, I am sending you a hard copy of the publication AFW 6 Reducing Deer Damage at Home and on the Farm . It contains several designs plus other information on repellents. In order for a fence to be effective it needs to be constructed prior to planting your crop. Once deer gat use to going into a sunflower field it's hard to stop them. if you have questions feel free to contact me. Marion Barnes
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Asked on: 05-02-21

Asked By: Will Montgomery

Topic of the Question: Session III: Mr. Brian Murphy

Question:
I have one more question for you. I am trying to convience the members in my hunt club to shoot more does in order to grow a better deer herd. I have heard that it is the mother that runs her yearling buck off the property and not other bucks. Is this true and if so, wouldn't shooting the does lead to seeing more bucks since they were never run out of an area when they were younger? Thanks, Will Montgomery

Answered by: Brian Murphy

Answer:
Will, To answer your question, I should first review the latest research on yearling buck dispersal from Penn State University, which ties together two previous studies - one showing that a fawn's mother is most responsible for causing her yearling male offspring to disperse and the other study showing that it is compeition among yearling bucks that triggers dispersal. The PSU study showed that both a fawn's mother and also other yearling bucks are likely involved in triggering dispersal. Several research projects have shown that yearling bucks generally disperse either during their first spring at 1 year of age, or later that fall at 18 months of age. The PSU study suggested that a fawn's mother is responsible for triggering spring dispersal, whereas fall dispersal was likely caused by competition among yearling bucks. So, back to your question. Will harvesting does reduce yearling buck dispersal? No one can say for sure, but the odds are that it may help slightly. However, several studies clearly show that 50-75% of all yearling bucks will disperse. The good news is that an increasing body of evidence shows that herds with moderate densities and fairly even sex ratios have lower levels of young buck disperal (e.g., QDM). So, harvesting does may to acheive these objectives may have a greater impact on lowering dispersal than simply harvesting a doe with a young male fawn at her side. Brian Murphy Executive Director / Wildlife Biologist Quality Deer Management Association
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Asked on: 05-03-16

Asked By: J. M. Witt

Topic of the Question: General Query

Question:
I just completed the Master Wildlifer (MW)course last night (3/15/05)held in Pell City (St. Clair County), Alabama. I am trying to use the MW website. We were never told the NW password (or I missed it). Where can I get the password in order to brows through the site?

Answered by: Webmaster

Answer:
Hi, You do not require a password to browse through the site. However, certain sections are protected for use by site coordinators only.These are mainly the Speaker notes pages. Sincerley, Webmaster
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Asked on: 05-03-21

Asked By: Donald Block

Topic of the Question: General Query

Question:
What is the username/password for the Speakers notes section? I attended the last course here at the Sandhills center in Columbia, and am looking for some kind of syllabus to send to Utah State University for credit. Thank you. Don Block

Answered by: Webmaster

Answer:
The speaker notes section is meant for site co-ordinatorsonly. However, if you seek notes from earlier programs you may visit the following link http://sref.info/courses/mw/
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Asked on: 05-03-26

Asked By: Paul Calame

Topic of the Question: Session VI: Dr. Chris Moorman

Question:
I am having difficulty finding the powerpoint slide you used regarding Harvest Preferences* (*From Arnnand and Thompson). The information on the slide did not show in the course printed material and if I remember correctly the information was to be put on the web site. Please provide instructions as to how to find it on the web site as well as other information such as the Clemson Beaver Pond Leveler construction plans. Thanks for an excellent course. Paul Calame

Answered by: Chris Moorman

Answer:
Paul, For some reason, the slide doesn't transfer to paper well. I can email the slide to you if you'd like. The information is from a paper in the Journal of Wildlife Management (Vol. 61), pages 159-171. There is a file on the Clemson Beaver Pond Leveler included on the Master Wildlifer web page under Coordinator Resources. Hope this helps.
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Asked on: 05-04-09

Asked By: Will Montgomery

Topic of the Question: Session IV: Mr. Tom Hughes

Question:
I have a group of pine that has recently been cleared leaving 3-4 acer block of pines while the rest is now just dirt. I was wondering what I needed to do to turn this area into the best nesting and brood rearing habitat? Any suggestions? thanks, Will Montgomery

Answered by: Tom Hughes

Answer:
Will, I'd need to know the acreage of the entire tract to give you the best answer, but based on what you've mentioned, here's what I'd suggest: I'd break the area into sections, following natural boundaries where I could. I would then set a prescribed fire schedule for each section, probably using a three year rotation and burning a third of the area each year. This way there is always a third of the area that is 2 years post-burn, a third that is 1 year post burn, and a third that has just been burned. In most areas, this plan should provide ideal nesting in the older sections, and great brood habitat in recently burned sections. Where possible, these sections should be well interspersed so that hens and poults don't have to travel far from nesting to brood rearing areas.
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Asked on: 05-04-12

Asked By: Jayne Lieske

Topic of the Question: General Query

Question:
What is the enrollment fee for the Master Wildlifer Program? I have an employee that just finished the course and would like to reimburse him for it. Thank you

Answered by: Webmaster

Answer:
The enrollment fee for the Mater Wildlifer program is $140 per person nad additional $60 for spouse.
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Asked on: 05-07-16

Asked By: Steve Merritt

Topic of the Question: General Query

Question:
I would like to know when and where I could take this course in my area. How do I sign up and is it offered online? Thanks

Answered by: Webmaster

Answer:
Hi Steve, I am not sure when the next Master Wildifer Course will be offered. However, Master Tree Farmer Session II would be offered in February of 2006. I would be putting up the details soon on the MTF website. Videos and Presentations of previous courses of Master Wildlifer (2203) can be found at the url below: http://sref.info/courses/mw/
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Asked on: 05-07-19

Asked By: margaret Anderson

Topic of the Question: General Query

Question:
are you planning to have a cource again next year? thank you.

Answered by: Webmaster

Answer:
Hi Margaret, Im sorry, but the Master willifer will be not be conducted next year. However, we are planning to organize Mater Tree Farmer around Feb-Mar 2006.